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Posts Tagged ‘job search strategies’

Is a New Job Forecast for 2014?

Now that we are entering the last two months of the year, there will be a lot of activity going on with the holidays fast approaching.   While you may be planning your holiday fare and making your lists for gift buying and decorating,  it might be time for you to think about adding a new job on those “To Do” lists.  Starting off the new year in a new position, with a new company, or working for yourself might be what you need to start out 2014 with a bang.

job sign

Organizations have already been planning their strategies for the new year and know which positions are needed to help them advance their goals and to position themselves for growth and financial success.  With that said, this is the time for you to take advantage of their strategies and to begin your job search now.   Managers will be feeling less pressured during this time so they can focus more on their tasks, including bringing on new talent, so this is the perfect time to get noticed.

Here are some basics to help you jump-start your move to a new job:

1.  Complete an assessment of yourself – including your skills, talents, accomplishments, etc., as well as of your preferred work environment and the industry/salary.  You might want to SWOT yourself to get a better handle on what you have to offer an employer and what opportunities are out there waiting for you.   Review all your job tasks, as well as your accomplishments/outcomes (with quantifiable numbers) and write them down.

2.  Update your resume and social media profiles – be sure to add in all those accomplishments you listed above so you stand out; remember WIIFM (What’s in it for me?)  so you can speak to the needs of the employer.  Create your brand so you are easy to identify and then use that brand in all your written and social media sites.  Update your LinkedIn profile with the brand tag line (be careful to not advertise that you are job-seeking), as well as your Facebook and Twitter accounts.  Clean-up any detrimental pictures or comments (especially tags) as employers are checking these out.

3.  If you aren’t sure where to look for a new position, you might check out: indeed.com, linkups.com, simplyhired.com, resumebear.com or startwire.com, to name a few.  When you find jobs you are interested in, match up your skills to the ones the employer is looking for to ensure you qualify, as well as to list those skills in your resume so they get picked up by the Applicant Tracking System used by most employers.

4.  Write a good cover letter that highlights certain skills or experiences you want the employer to notice, or to add skills/experiences you might want to bridge to your resume.   You want to get an interview and this can help to increase your chances of getting noticed.  Update your references or confirm with your current ones that they will still vouch for you.

5.  Create a strategy for how you will go about finding a job, when/time investment, and a feedback system or log to track the effectiveness of those strategies.  You don’t want to keep doing the same activity with no return on it.   Include in your strategies internet searches, company websites, networking meetings, current contacts, chat rooms, LinkedIn groups, and your alumni association.

Following these steps won’t guarantee you a new job but they can catapult you into a new position by the start of the year.  If you need any help, call today for a free 20-minute strategy session to get started!  http://www.cyscoaching.com

10 Tips for Career New Year’s Resolutions

Since we’re now in the beginning of the New Year, I thought I’d repost tips from when I was  interviewed last January for an article in the Orlando Sun Newspaper. I hope these may help you to get serious about your career search or for reving up your career:

1. Set the intention – decide on what it is you want in your career – do you want to find a new job, keep your current job, change industries, move into a leadership role, be a better employee, or is this the year you will start your own business; being clear on what it is you want – and why – will help you structure your time and efforts more effective

2. Commit – to the process; what tools and resources do you need that will aid you in effectively managing your career

3. Assess – write down your skills, talents, abilities, interests, values, experiences or, in other words, what do you have to offer an employer ; also assess your preferred work environment – where do you your best work and feel happiest; what type of company culture aligns with your values and will support you

 4. Research – who is hiring for the job you want and then explore the position you want – the pay, the benefits, the responsibilties and skills to see if you have them; look at the organization itself to assess it stability and offerings; what is the state of the industry you are in or want to move into

5. Set goals – what is that you want – type of job or position, company, etc.; be specific and exact

 6. Action steps – define what activities you need to do on a daily or weekly basis that will take you to your goal

 7. Develop a job search strategy – what types of job search activities will be most effective to use: Job boards;  Published positions; Unpublished positions;  Networking;  Associations;  Alumni Associations;  Friends/family ; Direct contacts;  Job Fairs;  Recruiters/headhunters;  Chat Sites;  Company Websites;  Social networking – LinkedIn, Facebook, Connections, etc.

8.  Set up a specific daily activity log – how you will spend time in job-search mode on a daily basis; this will help you to keep focused and productive

9. Self-care – activities or interests that will help to keep up the emotional level; take time to destress, like taking a walk or listening to music

10. Support system – find support to help you when you might frustrated or discouraged, such as family, friends, a career coach or a job seekers support group

Don’t Become a Hostage to Your Computer in Your Job Search

I don’t know if it was the recent moon phenomena we experienced or my bad luck, but I had yet another computer crash.  This time, my operating system stopped working.  No virus found so no explanation for it stopping.   You can imagine my panic but this time it was not for my data- I smartened up and had my data backed up – but for the need to be connected.  I am teaching an online course, so I definitely need to be accessible for my students.  But I felt so lost while my computer was getting fixed, which was a day.

I see how people in job-search mode can become tied to their computers.  It is common practice, and often the only port of entry, to apply for a job position by the computer.   So most people become “hostages” to a computer as they spend time searching for a position that they feel they qualify for and then spend more time completing the online application.  Then the wait begins to see if someone may read the information and if they call for an interview.  It can be a very tedious and frustrating process, which is why a good majority of job seekers have stopped or lessened their time (now down to 40 minutes a day!).  

So what is the answer?  There is no one “right” way but doing nothing will solve nothing and leave you feeling more frustrated.  But spending all your time on the computer will also leave you feeling just as frustrated. Getting out among people will help you – go to a networking meeting or a professional association meeting, volunteer or set-up some informational interviews.  These will help you to meet people who either are in a position to give you a job or to connect you with someone who can.  It will also get you back out in the working world which can give you credibility and confidence.   You might have to ask yourself if you need to revise your job-search strategy (you do have one??) to include being out among the crowds.  Getting away from your computer can be the ‘shot-in-the-arm’ you need to regain your professional footing and to connect with others who can lead you to finding a job.

Why the Holidays Are a Great Time to Job Hunt

Traditionally, the holidays are a time of great preparation as you are busy decorating your house with lights and ornaments, buying presents for those on your list, or baking goodies for the holiday meal.  It is a time of parties and get-togethers with family and friends.  It would seem that with all of this activity it is not the time to look for a job.  But you could not be more wrong.  The last couple of weeks can be the perfect time to find a job, as most companies are readying for the new year and are streamlining their  focus and systems.  It is also a time when their is movement aas people take other positions or make a move in some way.  Organizations know of  and could be planning for job openings that will occur due to expansions or new contracts that will create the need for workers.

This is not the time to be idle.  Follow these tips, get yourself together and get out there:

1. Be targeted – focus on the specific job or organization you want and keep looking for ways to get in; look at company job boards and sign up for automatic notifications when jobs are posted 

2. Be visible – get yourself out among people and let them know you are looking for a position or an introduction to someone who can get you in the do0r of an employer.  This is not the time to be shy, especially if you are at holiday gatherings 

3. Be indispensible -  sign up for temp agencies or contract work; most employees want to be off for the holidays so this could be a way to get income as well as the lead-in to full-or part-time employment

4. Be a giver – this would be a great time to volunteer your services which can offer help to an organization and get your skills and capabilities noticed; you will also be developing good relationships that will put you in the forefront when openings do occur

Keeping your focus on finding a job during this time will help you to keep your momentum and emotional level up and keep you ahead of the those who believe there are no jobs to be had or that organizations do not hire during this time of year.  This can be the time that employers are preparing and scheduling interviews for positions that will become available in January.  It can also keep you in job-search mode which will give you the edge among others.

If You Want a Job You Have to Do the Work

In an earlier post, I talked about doing the work in planning your career.  If you are unemployed and looking for a job, you need to be able to answer the question if you are doing the work that it takes.  It is tough out there but not impossible to find a job.  But it takes consistent effort to conduct a focused, strategized job search campaign.  It starts with knowing who you are – your skills sets – and how they will relate to a potential job and organization.  Time and again, and it is more recently, that I hear clients wanting results but not willing to do the work it takes.  It seems they want to circumvent the process and get instant results.  Often, their expectations are behind the times – they do not understand how the new work-world is operating, which means they are not aware of how to go about finding a job to “fit” into this new world.

I am a vanilla type of person, which means I believe in the basics of most activities.  You need to understand and operate on some tried and true practices and then you can add the flavors, so to speak later.  I operate on the four steps to career management: assessment, of both self and organizations/industry; setting goals; developing action steps; and then creating a feedback system on how your job search activites are working.  This is where the work comes in, particularly with the assessement part.  If you don’t know your skill sets and benefits, or they type of job you want, don’t bother searching for a job or you will become frustrated and become unmotivated to continue.  The other half of the equation is researching who hires for your particular skills and experiences and then learning more about those organizations to understand their culture, products/services or economic stability; looking at the state of the industry you want to work in; researching salary ranges; and any other type of information that would help you decide and focus on the direction you want to go.

Until you do this work, you will spin your wheels and delay becoming employed.  Noone can help you do this part – it is all up to you.  Doing the work on the front end will help you to better understand yourself, the direction you want to go, and help you to feel more focused and confident to continue on the daily journey and land the job you want.

How Persistence Can Help You in Your Job Search and In Your Life

I am a guest blogger on the site The Work at Home Woman – here is the link to my latest article. Hope you find it useful – let me know if you find it helpful!

http://www.theworkathomewoman.com/how-persistence-can-help-you-in-your-job-search-and-in-your-life/

Focusing Only on the Money Won’t Get You a Job

I see it over and over again – job seekers feeling confused and frustrated that they can’t find a job because they are only focusing on the money they will make.  While pay and benefits are important, they are not the only factors to consider when searching for a job.  You have to think about the sacrifices you will have to make, not to mention the workload and stress, that come along with high-paying jobs.  If your values and lifestyle do not mesh or you are not willing to do the work that is necessary then you will need to re-focus on finding a position that will fit and the look to see how you can set goals for how you will get there.

I once talked to a young man who is 29 years old and had worked his way up to the manager of a major, large retail chain.  He was preparing to interview for a district manager position and I have no doubt that he got the position.  In realizing his success, this young man was very focused on his career path and had taken the steps necessary to get where he was.   He reported that he had set career goals for himself at a very young age, 18, when he started working for the company and wanted to progress every two years; he would move into the “next step” and learn all he could so he was prepared for the next position.  While income was important to this young man, he felt that the learning and self-development opportunities were invaluable and motivating, as well as the ability to develop his employees to also move into management positions.

I think a good lesson can be learned from this story.   If you focus on your reasons for wanting to pursue your career path, aligning with your values, and setting clear goals for yourself can get you to the right job opportunity that can make you happy.  It will give you the purpose and the passion to work hard.  In time, the money will come!

Should You Be Working with a Career Coach?

If you have been umployed for longer than 3 months, you need to find a career coach – and fast!  Here are some benefits:

1. they can help you to regain composure when you feel thrust into unemployment and help you to regain your equilibrium

2. they can help you become focused and to set new career goals with action steps

3. they can give you “the scoop” on the job market:  who is hiring, where to leverage your skills and experience, using technology to market yourself

4. they can coach you on job search techniques, such as resumes, interviewing, business etiquette, and salary negotiations

5. they can help you to find your purpose and passion and take that into the workforce

6. they can help you to resolve workplace conflicts or stressors and help you learn more adaptive skills to cope with work life

7. they can help you to learn to manage your personal life and your work life

8. they can help you decide if you want to retire, and then help you exit the workforce on your terms

9. they can help you to leverage your skills and talents into a career path, possibly to get paid for what you know

10. they can help you to understand yourself better so you can manage your emotions and increase your attitude to be a highly engaged, highly motivated, and highly productive employee

A  job search can become tedious and demoralizing, as job searches are done and resumes are sent but there may be no responses.  It can become very depressing and frustrating.  Hiring a coach and spending money may seem like an impossibility, but the money you invest in yourself, and in your job search, can pay off enormously.  Having someone who knows the industry and who is focused on your success can help save you time that could be better spent on the right direction rather than the traditional way of job hunting.  A career coach can help you gain more money and benefits through salary negotion; they can help you to see how valuable you are to an organization.  A coach can help you to see your worth, to take more risks, and to grow your ego-strength, all of which will help you to believe and act on your behalf.  The end result will be a successful job search that will help you effectively manage your career and give you the preparation for the future should you need it.  Of course, these tips do not apply only to those who have lost a job as they serve well to all job seekers.  Shouldn’t you make the investment in yourself?

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